Animal Dentistry and Oral Surgery Specialists, LLC

2409 Omro Road
Oshkosh, WI 54904-7713

(920)233-8409

mypetsdentist.com

Dental and Oral Radiology

It is virtually impossible to practice veterinary dentistry without dental radiographs!

Dental radiology is the most vital tool in veterinary dentistry.  Dental radiographs ( X-rays) are essential in making an accurate diagnosis.  The diagnosis is the basis for understanding the prognosis, and in deciding how to treat our patients.  Dental radiographs are essential in performing dental procedures, in evaluating procedural success and in documentation of dental and oral health.  Please say "no Thank You" to any dental procedure including teeth cleaning without dental x-rays.

Why would you want dental radiographs when teeth cleaning?

We provide a comprehensive oral health assessment and treatment (COHAT) for pets when the teeth are cleaned.  Dental x-rays with periodontal probing help with the assessment.  It makes no sense to place an animal under anesthesia to clean their teeth, and miss an important problem.  If you don't look (take x-rays), you most likely will not find problems that need attention.

Two thirds of our dog's and cat's teeth are under the gingiva (gums), and are not viewable.  Dental radiographs help in the assessment.  They allow assessment of the teeth (fractures or internal disease), the surrounding soft tissues (periodontal disease, stomatitis, CUPS, cysts, draining tracks, facial swellings, fistulas or tumors), the joints (TMJ or mandibular symphysis) and of the bone (jaw fractures).  Dental radiographs can reveal subgingival (under the gums) foreign objects, cysts and tumors.

Studies have shown that without dental radiographs, significant pathology is missed in up to 75% of pets.

Diagnose first, establish treatment plan, then treat meticulously!

Consider a pet that is rubbing the face, gulping or excessively salivating, and you don't see a reason for these behaviors.  Would you just hope for the behavior to go away without treatment?  Providing antibiotics and or steroids (without a diagnosis) is rarely a beneficial treatment on a long term basis, and may be harmful for the pet.  Indiscriminate use of antibiotics may be harmful to pets and people by creating resistant bacteria (for more information, Google MRSA).

Dental radiographs may identify a foreign object entrapped between the teeth, or in the gingival sulcus.  The logical treatment would obviously be to remove the foreign object.  This problem will not resolve with the use of medications alone!

We always diagnose first, plan the best treatment and perform the necessary treatment meticulously.  Dental radiology replaces a guess with a diagnosis, and allows for the correct treatment to be optimally performed.

Dental radiology for the young patient.

Dental radiographs help determine whether teeth might be abnormal, malpositioned, missing, non-vital (dead) or vital (alive).

This first case could not be diagnosed or treated without dental radiographs!

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

This young patient had a severe facial
swelling.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Non-vital (dead) tooth.  Periodontal
probing with dental radiographs
provided the diagnosis.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Dental extraction was appropriately performed.
This radiograph demonstrated an abnormal
adjacent premolar tooth.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide 

Dental radiograph of the extracted
premolar tooth.

Second young patient being evaluated for normal developing teeth!
This evaluation would not be possible without dental radiographs.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Left lower premolar area.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Left lower molar area.

Persistent primary (baby) canines must be removed when secondary (adult) canines have erupted to avoid malocclusion development.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Persistent right primary canine (baby) tooth.
The presence of the primary and the secondary
(adult) tooth at the same time is a reason
for immediate extraction to avoid malocclusion
development.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Persistent left primary upper canine tooth
same patient as above.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Persistent right primary upper canine tooth.
Notice how thin the primary tooth is.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Root tip fracture of the primary tooth. 
Dental radiographs are essential to
locate and remove the fractured root
tip.  Note the missing premolar tooth!

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Dental radiograph confirms complete
root tip extraction.

Adult dog with dental malformation and malpositioned secondary tooth with persistent primary premolar teeth.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Persistent primary premolar teeth.
This dog would rub the face vigorously.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

View of malformed and malpositioned
secondary tooth just below the eye.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Primary teeth extracted which allows
access for the extraction of the malformed
and malpositioned secondary tooth.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

The malformed tooth has a dilacerated
(curved) root.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Extraction of the malformed, malpositioned
secondary tooth.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

This malformed (dilacerated root),
malpositioned tooth could not have been
completely extracted without dental radiographs.

Dental radiographs identify abnormal dilacerated (curved) roots.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide
This young dog was presented because
the primary (baby) teeth failed to erupt. 
Radiographs reveal the diagnosis;
severely dilacerated roots.

Every time a tooth is missing, a dental radiograph is required.  Unerupted teeth can cause dentigerous cyst formation.  These cysts are locally destructive and can result in jaw fracture or facial swelling.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Left facial swelling; extraoral view.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Left facial swelling intraoral view.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Cyst formation in left maxilla (upper arch).

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Clinical view of the embedded tooth
within the cyst.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Embedded tooth removed from the cyst.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Dental radiograph confirms the cyst
is free of dental remnants.

Similar case of a missing tooth on the mandible (lower jaw).

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Directly behind the canine tooth, the first
premolar tooth appears to be missing.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Unerupted premolar appeared clinically
as a missing tooth.  Dentigerous cyst
was the working diagnosis.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

The embedded first premolar tooth is
demonstrated above.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Severe destruction; major bone loss
is evident.  Histologic analysis
confirmed dentigerous cyst as the
diagnosis.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Oral surgery was performed to remove
the cyst and a osteopromotive (graft)
material was placed to strengthen the
jaw to avoid jaw fracture.

Dental radiographs are essential for performing root canal therapy.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Radiographs needed to perform root canal therapy.

Dental radiographs are needed to evaluate teeth for restorations.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Restoration of endodontically (root canal therapy)
treated tooth.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Restoration of canine tooth defect.

Radiographs help with diagnosis and with treatment.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide resized to 300 pixels wide

Severe stage 4 of 4 periodontal disease.
These teeth are "hopeless" and due to
excessive bone loss, dental extraction
should be a simple procedure!

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

The dental extraction was not as simple
as was expected.  Two root tips were
left. 

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Dental radiographs were essential
to find and remove these root tips.

Radiographs are critically important to help this patient with chronic pain.  Dental radiographs can help with the diagnosis, treatment and elimination of pain!

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

"CUPS" is a painful immune mediated
disease condition.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

With "CUPS" there is often severe destructive
periodontal disease.  Dental extraction
offers the best long term prognosis.

Severe periodontal disease is diagnosed with dental radiography and periodontal probing.  Dental radiographs are needed to perform dental extraction.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Dental radiography is helpful in
performing dental extraction.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Dental radiography allows verification
of complete extraction.

Discolored teeth are likely to be non-vital (dead), and a health risk for companion animals.  Infection can spread from non-vital teeth, through the bloodstream, and throughout the body!

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Discolored (tan) incisor teeth are a health
risk for companion animals.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Dental radiographs are essential for
the evaluation of these teeth.

Dental radiographs are essential in the extraction of this fractured tooth.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Fractured lower canine tooth is
demonstrated on this radiograph.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Dental radiographs are necessary for
the extraction of this lower canine tooth.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

This cat was presented to the Animal
Emergency Center and Specialty Services
screaming and pawing at her face!

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Dental radiographs demonstrate the
severe pathology.

Dental radiographs are needed for the diagnosis, treatment planning and the repair of jaw fractures.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Cat; jaw fracture behind the molar tooth.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Dog; bilateral jaw fracture; complication from dental extraction.

No Description

Fractuerd teeth must be evaluated with dental radiographs.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide
 
Dental radiograph above demonstrates
endodontic disease (large halos at the
lower fourth premolar) tooth roots. 
Periodontal disease is also evident in
the premolar area shown.

The "TMJ" is a hinge joint responsible for the opening and closing of the mouth.  Dental radiographs can be very useful in the evaluation of the TMJ.

No Description resized to 300 pixels wide

Dental radiograph of the "TMJ".



Dental radiography is essential to perform every aspect of veterinary dentistry. 

Dog Dental Care

Cat Dental Care

Home